Arctic Data and Web Applications

PSD Arctic Region or Arctic Focus Datasets

Research scientist Sara Crepinsek replaces a solar radiation instrument at the Alert Station in Canada. Alert is the northern most located Arctic station. Credit: Sara Crepinsek, CIRES
Research scientist Sara Crepinsek replaces a solar radiation instrument at the Alert Station in Canada. Alert is the northern most located Arctic station. Credit: Sara Crepinsek, CIRES
Did you know...The first major effort by Europeans to study the meteorology of the Arctic was the First International Polar Year in 1882–1883. Eleven nations provided support to establish twelve observing stations around the Arctic. The observations were not as widespread or long-lasting as would be needed to describe the climate in detail, but they provided the first cohesive look at the Arctic weather.

PSD has a number of Arctic focused datasets and datasets that include the Arctic region that we make available to interested users.

Observatory FTP Data

Arctic Web Applications

PSD has a number of web applications that can plot, extract and analyze various datasets. A few are specific to Arctic Datasets while some can be used with any of our gridded datasets. The ones of most interest to arctic researchers are:

Timeseries Extraction and Analysis

Maps and Crossections of Gridded Datasets

Instrument Data Displays


Arctic Datasets in Other ESRL Divisions

Global Monitoring Division


Atmospheric Data from the IASOA Observatories

IASOA Observatories Include: Cherskii, Russia; Tiksi, Russia; Pallas, Finland; Ny-Aalesund, Svalbard; Villum, Greenland; Summit, Greenland; Alert, Canada; Eureka, Canada; Oliktok Point, Alaska; and Barrow, Alaska.

Take a look: IASOA Data At-A-Glance


Other Arctic Data and Dataset Plotting/Analysis Pages

Polar Observations & Processes
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