Atmospheric Science for Renewable Energy Team Members

  • Dave Turner

    Dave Turner is the Renewable Energy Program Manager for the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. Turner's work at ESRL includes leading efforts to improve foundational weather forecast skill for wind and solar power applications. He joined NOAA in 2010, and moved to ESRL in 2016 to work with the Rapid Refresh modeling team. He is an expert on boundary layer remote sensing and processes, and serves on several national and international advisory committees.

  • Rapid Refresh Handout

    Laura Bianco is a Research Scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado. She works in Jim Wilczak’s group. She hold a BSc in Physics and earned her Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from the University of L’Aquila in Italy, in 2002. She is also an Associate Editor for the Atmospheric Measurement Techniques Journal. Her research focuses at improving remote sensing observations in the boundary layer and study atmospheric processes in this layer of the atmosphere. She was involved in the WFIP campaign planning and data analysis and will be involved in WFIP2 as well.

  • Irina Djalalova

    Irina Djalalova is a research associate at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado. She works in Jim Wilczak’s group in ESRL’s Physical Science Division. She holds a B.S. and M.S. in Physics, with specialization in Applied Mechanics, from Moscow State University, Russia, School of Mathematics and Mechanic. For many years she worked in the radar group of the NOAA Environment Technology Laboratory. She currently works in the renewable energy field, participating in all major projects including WFIP, WFIP2 and POWER. Her interests cover the validation and visualization of the observational data and corresponded models data by creating the on-going project web sites, including design, real-time management, quality control and analysis of the data.

  • Eric James

    Eric James is a research associate at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado. He works in Stan Benjamin’s group in the Earth System Research Laboratory's Global Systems Division, helping with the development and testing of next-generation Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models, including the 13-km Rapid Refresh and the 3-km High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR). In particular, Eric maintains a long-term archive of HRRR forecasts, which can be used to estimate renewable energy resources at a high resolution throughout the continental United States. Eric is also currently participating in the Solar Forecast Improvement Project (SFIP).

  • Jaymes Kenyon

    Jaymes Kenyon is a scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado. As a member of the Earth Modeling Branch at the Earth System Research Laboratory, he works on developing and evaluating the physical paramaterizations used in the RAP and HRRR models, especially the turbulence (boundary layer) and subgrid-scale cloud parameterizations. Jaymes is also involved with the high-resolution numerical modeling aspects of WFIP2. Previously, he was a U.S. Air Force weather officer.

  • Terra Ladwig

    Terra Ladwig is a research scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado. She is a member of the Earth Modeling Branch in the Global Systems Division of the Earth Systems Research Laboratory. Terra earned her Ph.D. in meteorology from the University of Oklahoma in 2014. Data assimilation is the focus of her research. While at OU she worked on storm-scale radar data assimilation with the Warn-On-Forecast group at the National Severe Storms Laboratory. Currently, she is working to improve the cloud and precipitation hydrometeor analysis that is used in the RAP and HRRR models and to develop storm-scale ensemble data assimilation for the HRRR.

  • Kathleen Lantz

    Kathleen Lantz is a research scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado. She is a member of the Global Radiation Group (GRAD) of the Global Monitoring Division (GMD) where she leads the Solar Renewable Energy team. She received her Ph.D. at the University of Colorado, Boulder and an NCAR ASP Postdoctoral Fellowship to study photolysis and air quality. Her research focuses on atmospheric radiation, radiative transfer, surface radiation budget, and aerosol properties. Her recent work emphasizes solar radiation for renewable energy and GOES-R satellite product validation. Current projects include the NOAA-DOE Solar Forecasting Improvement Project (SFIP) and Wind Forecasting Improvement Project (WFIP-2). She has served on the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) UV Radiation Instruments Group, is a past contributor of the Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion, and the BAMs State of the Climate Report in 2013, 2014, and 2015.

  • Joe Olson

    Joseph B. Olson is a research scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado. His is a member of the Earth Modeling Branch in the Global Systems Division of the Earth Systems Research Laboratory. Joe earned a Ph. D. in Atmospheric Sciences from Stony Brook University in 2007. He has made improvements to the MYNN planetary boundary layer scheme used in the 13-km Rapid Refresh (RAP) and 3-km High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) weather models. Currently, he is the NOAA Technical Lead for the Wind Forecast Improvement Project 2, which aims to improve forecasts of wind-turbine-height-winds in complex terrain.

  • Yelena Pichugina

    Yelena Pichugina is a Research Scientist in the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), affiliated with Atmospheric Remote Sensing Group of the Earth System Research Laboratory. In this capacity she defines and executes field projects involving remote sensing instruments, and performs scientific research in atmospheric science and wind energy. Her expertise includes studies of boundary layer and mesoscale processes, applications of Doppler lidar measurements inland and offshore to quantify wind and turbulence at the height of turbine rotors, including Low Level Jets and turbine wake effects. She has also used ship-borne lidar data to validate forecast models. She is a member of the AMS Renewable Energy Committee.

  • Jim Wilczak

    Jim Wilczak is a senior scientist at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, where he leads a boundary layer research team. His research includes remote sensing of the atmosphere, turbulence, ensemble forecasting, air-sea interaction, and forecasting for wind energy. He has received several NOAA distinguished authorship awards and has been an Associate Editor of the journal Boundary Layer Meteorology for the past 15 years. Most recently he was the technical lead for the DOE-sponsored Wind Forecast Improvement Project.