Larson K. M., E. Small, E. Gutmann, A. Bilich, J. Braun and V. U. Zavorotny (December 2008): Use of GPS receivers as a soil moisture network for water cycle studies. Geophys. Res. Lett., 35 (24), L24405. doi:10.1029/2008GL036013

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Measurements of soil moisture, both its global distribution and temporal variations, are required to study the water and carbon cycles. A global network of in situ soil moisture stations is needed to supplement datasets from satellite sensors. We demonstrate that signals routinely recorded by Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers for precise positioning applications can also be related to surface soil moisture variations. Over a three month interval, GPS-derived estimates from a 300 m2 area closely match soil moisture fluctuations in the top 5 cm of soil measured with conventional sensors, including the rate and amount of drying following six precipitation events. Thousands of GPS receivers that exist worldwide could be used to estimate soil moisture in near real-time, with L-band signals that complement future satellite missions.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: PSD Publications
Divisions: Physical Sciences Division
DOI: 10.1029/2008GL036013
URI: http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/pubs/id/eprint/727