Global Monitoring Division
  • Mauna Loa
    Mauna Loa, Hawaii
  • MLO CO2
    Mauna Loa CO2
  • Barrow, Alaska
    Barrow, Alaska
  • American Samoa
    American Samoa
  • Water Vapor Balloon Flight
    Picture from Water Vapor balloon flight, 20km altitude
  • Solar Transmisison
    Mauna Loa Apparent Solar Transmission
  • Hats data
    Global Means of various Halogenated compounds
  • Surface Radiation
    Surface Radiation Measurement Instruments near Penn State
  • Trinidad Head
    Trinidad Head, California
  • South Pole Ozone
    South Pole Ozone Hole Profile
  • South Pole
    The Atmospheric Research Observatory at South Pole
  • Summit
    Summit, Greenland
  • Carbontracker
    CO2 Weather computed by Carbontracker Model
Climate ESRL's Global Monitoring Division conducts sustained observations and research related to global distributions, trends, sources and sinks of atmospheric constituents that are capable of forcing change in the climate of the Earth. This research will advance climate projections and provide scientific policy-relevant, decision support information to enhance society's ability to plan and respond.
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Ozone ESRL's Global Monitoring Division conducts research on the depletion of the global stratospheric ozone layer and Antarctic ozone hole through global surface-based monitoring of total-column ozone, ultraviolet radiation, and ozone-depleting gases, including those regulated by the Montreal Protocol. Continued surveillance is necessary in order to verify the expected recovery of the ozone layer.
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Air Quality ESRL's Global Monitoring Division monitors levels of air quality elements such as tropospheric ozone, carbon monoxide and aerosol particles in non-source regions which may be affected by long range transport from distant sources of industrial pollution. This large-scale transport affects baseline air quality which must be monitored in order to determine the importance of regional sources that may impact the environment and public health.
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News and Highlights

Antarctic ozone hole similar to last year
October 30, 2014

Antarctic ozone hole similar to last year

The Antarctic ozone hole, which forms annually in the August to October period, reached its peak size on September 11, stretching to 9.3 million square miles (24.1 million square kilometers), roughly the same size as last year’s peak of 9.3 million square miles (24 million square kilometers) on September 16, 2013. This is an area similar in size to North America.
ESRL Scientists honored with Colorado Governor
October 16, 2014

ESRL Scientists honored with Colorado Governor's Award

A team of NOAA and Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) scientists from the Earth System Research Laboratory's Chemical Sciences Division (CSD), Global Monitoring Division (GMD), and Physical Sciences Division (PSD) has won a 2014 CO-LABS Governor's Award for High-Impact Research.
Understanding the Ozone Hole - a video designed for high school level students
September 12, 2014

Understanding the Ozone Hole - a video designed for high school level students

The sun rises at the South Pole every Sept 21, after six months of darkness, and the spark of light from the rising sun also starts a season of ozone depletion down south. With the approach of that date in mind, a CIRES/NOAA scientist and videographer has developed a short, educational video that focuses on the ozone research being conducted by NOAA and CIRES scientists.
CarbonTracker-CH4: An assimilation system for estimating emissions of atmospheric methane
September 1, 2014

CarbonTracker-CH4: An assimilation system for estimating emissions of atmospheric methane

The NOAA CarbonTracker-CH4 Data Assimilation Product has been developed as a companion product to NOAA's CarbonTracker (CO2), with the goal of producing quantitative estimates of emissions of methane to the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources for North America and the rest of the world. CarbonTracker-CH4 emission estimates are consistent with observed patterns of CH4 in the atmosphere.
Greenhouse gases top 400 ppm for three months in a row at Mauna Loa
July 8, 2014

Greenhouse gases top 400 ppm for three months in a row at Mauna Loa

For the first time since carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has been measured, the levels of this greenhouse gas at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, have been above 400 parts per million every single day for three straight months.
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Research Groups

  • Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network

    The GGGRN makes measurements of the spatial and temporal distributions of greenhouse gases and provides essential constraints to our understanding of the global carbon cycle.
  • Halocarbons and other Trace Species

    The HATS group quantifies the distributions and magnitudes of the sources and sinks for important ozone-depleting and greenhouse gases.
  • Aerosols

    The goals of this program are to characterize means, variability, and trends of climate-forcing properties of different types of aerosols.
  • Solar and Infrared Radiation

    Activities involve empirical and theoretical research of the Earth's surface radiation budget.
  • Ozone and Water Vapor

    Research on the nature and causes of the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer and the role of ozone and water vapor in forcing climate change.
  • Observatory Operations

    NOAA/ESRL operates staffed atmospheric baseline observatories from which numerous in situ and remote atmospheric and solar measurements are conducted.

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